7 Mile Road

Wow! I didn’t realize so much time had passed since my last post—almost four months. Looks like my intended short break from blogging turned into an extended time off.

But I have been writing. Two of my short stories have been recently published, “Come Out, Come Out, Wherever You Are” and “Birds of a Feather”, plus one poem, “Red”, will be later this month. “Come Out, Come Out…” was published in Tell-Tale Press, clicking here will take you straight to the story, and “Birds of a Feather” was published in The Literary Hatchet, Issue # 24. I don’t have a direct link to it, but you can go to their website here and download a free PDF of Issue # 24 if you wish to read it. I also have three brand new shorts I’m currently trying to place, so wish me luck.

And in my WordPress absence I have started a novel in my preferred genre when writing long pieces: Southern Gothic. According to a web search, characteristics of Southern Gothic literature include:

  • Isolation and marginalization
  • Violence and crime
  • Sense of place
  • Freakishness and the grotesque
  • Destitution and decay
  • Oppression and discrimination

I think my novel will include everything on that list, and then some. Truth be told, every novel-length piece of fiction I’ve turned out has been Southern Gothic to a greater or lesser degree. I am drawn to it, perhaps because it’s what I know, especially the sense of place. I am rural Southern through and through.

The working title is 7 Mile Road. And a lot of bad things happen on 7 Mile Road.

On a side note, the title was inspired by an actual road sign I saw on a recent vacation. Traveling along a state highway in Arkansas, I saw a turn off for a road called “4 Mile Creek Road”, and I grabbed my phone and typed it into my notes app (which has taken the place of the pen and pad I used to carry with me). The name intrigued me, and when I got home and sat down a few days later to work on my novel, 4 Mile Creek morphed into 7 Mile Road. I like to put a title to a piece early on; it grounds me to the story. And in this case, it served as inspiration; it cemented the setting, allowing the flow of additional plot details.

I don’t know if this novel will ever venture forth into the world, be it by the traditional route or self-publishing. I just know that it’s in my head, the characters yacking back and forth, wanting their story to be told.

Well, I’ve got some catching up to do on WordPress. I know I can’t read all the posts from all the blogs I follow that I missed. Not enough time. But at least I can get back in the flow. I’m a capricious person, and as such might drop off WordPress again in the future. But at least for now, I’m back.

©️2019 KT Workman

Photo via Pixabay

Rules

I read a blog post recently about the use of correct grammar in creative writing, where the author was questioning if there are any hard and fast rules.

It depends…

Are you writing only for pleasure or a hobby? If so, it doesn’t matter whether or not you use the correct verb tense, misplace a modifier, or use quotation marks when you should have used italics, or vice versa.

But if you are a serious writer, are self-publishing or looking for an agent, you can’t pitch the rules out the window. Some think if you tell an engaging story, your manuscript will be snatched up, and an editor will fix the poor grammar; that’s not going to happen unless you have a unique angle, such as being raised on a remote island by a family of seals. A few grammatical mistakes and typos most likely will be overlooked; but a manuscript littered with errors will not. And as for self-publishing, yes, you can publish your book sans editing. But do you really want your sloppy grammar out there for all the world to see?

It all boils down to whether, for you, writing is an avocation or vocation. If it’s an avocation, you can throw caution—or nouns and verbs—to the wind. Write with impunity. But if writing is a vocation, tread that grammatical mind field with care, even on your personal blog. When considering whether or not to take you on, literary agents and publishers have been known to google your name or byline, with many asking outright for the address of your blog/website. So it’s best that any piece of writing with your name attached to it is as error-free as you can make it.

Some use blogging as a pastime. Some use it to stretch their creative legs. How you use blogging should dictate your adherence to proper grammar.

©2019 KT Workman